Archive for August, 2007

links for 2007-08-21

August 21, 2007 at 3:17 pm Leave a comment

links for 2007-08-18

August 18, 2007 at 3:18 pm Leave a comment

links for 2007-08-17

August 17, 2007 at 3:19 pm Leave a comment

The Simpsons Movie as a Christian vechile

 

Every movie is a little world that creates it’s own little precepts. The Simpsons movie though might very well be the largest critique of 90s American liberalism I can think of though. God exists in Springfield and Homer Simpson, whose Jebus joke once represented a growing national apathy towards religion, is now an outsider lacking the warm family values and influence on morality that Ned Flanders has. Homer’s “jebus” comment not only seems used, but he makes it in church where the humor changes from being freeing oneself from religious dictate to being oblivious to the insentitivty of the joke. Once upon a time Flanders was a shinning example of the confining strictures of traditional values, while Lisa expelled neo-liberalism, and Homer was a good hearted man whose pleasure seeking seemed a healthy, but self-obsessed past time. The Simpsons have now become something of the outcastes of their block versus the way they almost perfectly caught the dysfunctional, but loving aspects of the American family in the mid-90s. Flanders has become a foil who knocks Homer and his family off the block. While Lisa’s idealism has become more sharpened and she still commands a certian amount of respect, you can’t help but feel as the show changed from Bart to Homer it is now becoming little more than a vechile for Flander’s philosophy. That isn’t necessarily a bad thing, Ned isn’t a bad guy, but part of what made The Simpsons fun was its acceptance of our imperfections, the way not only god had died, but the way we’d lost our fathers and families had exploded from homogenous cultures like the Flanders to the plurality of views of The Simpsons’ address. Flanders was funny becuase next to memories of Tammy Fay Baker, the boredome of childhood church pews, and the utter exasperation of the religious right to deal with the yuppie ideals of the 80s as they became the engine of the country’s progress and enshrined in the form of tolerance, such an image of a Christian seemed not only ridicilous and out of whack with the country as a whole, but down right unwholesome. One gets the feeling that Murdoch and company have reshaped the show for a new demographic, but it’s telling that in order for the christian values of right-wing american to entertain, they have to borrow a story and a people from those that opposed them.

August 17, 2007 at 6:08 am Leave a comment

links for 2007-08-16

August 16, 2007 at 3:18 pm Leave a comment

links for 2007-08-15

August 15, 2007 at 3:17 pm Leave a comment

The Mysteries of Pittsburgh by Michael Chabon… quickly

1. It reminds me of people. In particular two friends of mine from college, which of course means it captures youth perfectly.

2. It’s controlled. Chabon isn’t interested in splattering Michael Chabon mega-genius across every page, but rather it’s like he’s so in love with these two characters that he forgets himself and like Arthur, his words are plotted for maximum manipulation, humor, and pathos.

3. The gay experience if essentially the San Francisco of our generation. Everyone has had this experience, but that’s what troubles me about the novel, it’s ending ends with a call towards women as being preferable because they’re different, similar to my pronouncement a few weeks back that loving a guy is easy, but a women harder. I felt disappointed that Chabon wasn’t capable of providing me with more enlightenment beyond what I had already realized. After all while Phlox might have an engrossing world, this doesn’t quite capture the feeling of finding the right one, that special little opposite sex-er with the clever ideas and good haircut. Is dating the wrong girl really better than the right guy? Phlox, I guess, isn’t a good foil for Arthur Lecomete, who seems like a much better partner for Art than Phlox. Cleveland and Jane are a heterosexual couple that make out Chabon’s idea in a better light. Phlox weakens Art’s argument by her very vapidness, while Jane and Cleveland show how even the difference of sex can be a way of growing closer than Art and Art probably could.

4. Modern day literature seems to be marked by authors who gloriously expel their failures whether is Foster Wallace’s realization that he’s not a genius or Dave Egger’s humility or Steve Erickson’s repetition etc. However Chabon is genuinely a good author, unlike Wallace’s early stuff Chabon’s writing is the product of plotting and contemplation unlike Eggers he isn’t dependent on auto-biography for his stories, lastly he is able to bring his novels to a satisfying conclusion while making the story churn into the finely form ideals needed to not only lend it emotional weight, but to let the concepts take flight.

5. It made me rethink my own views of my own literature. It made me think maybe I could be an author… if ya know I only actually wrote something sometimes.

6. The ending nearly made me cry and the book’s characters really are so lovable it’s hard to believe.

August 15, 2007 at 5:58 am 2 comments

Older Posts Newer Posts


Calendar

August 2007
M T W T F S S
« Jul   Sep »
 12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  

Posts by Month

Posts by Category


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 435 other followers